Magazine article Natural History

A June Honey Moon

Magazine article Natural History

A June Honey Moon

Article excerpt

For many people, it was the everchanging Moon that first attracted their attention skyward. Our view of Earth's only natural satellite-perhaps more accurately defined as a "companion planet" because of its large size-depends solely on reflected sunlight. And our changing perspective on the Moon not Earth's shadow-creates its phases.

This phenomenon is easily demonstrated with a ball and a flashlight. Have someone shine the light on the ball while you view it from various angles: you'll see the complete range of waxing and waning phases. Or if you are outside during a day when the Moon is visible, hold the ball at arm's length next to the Moon; because both objects are in the same relationship to the Sun, the illuminated portion of the ball will match that of the Moon.

A full Moon is always directly opposite the Sun in the sky, rising in the east like a giant, round projection screen as the Sun sets. In summer, watch this drama from a beach or mountaintop. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.