Magazine article Information Management

Resolution Redux

Magazine article Information Management

Resolution Redux

Article excerpt

It happens without fail. Every year, resolutions are made. On Jan. 1, promises to exercise, lose weight, quit smoking, or go back to school seem like such great ideas and so easy to accomplish. By Jan. 31, however, the lofty goals often have proved to be too overwhelming and are thus abandoned for another year.

The key to achieving a seemingly far-fetched goal is to start immediately, according to Hinda Dubin, M.D., a clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.

"Action precedes motivation, not the other way around," said Dubin. Once you initiate an action - the smallest of actions - you pick up momentum and you'll realize, 'hey, this isn't so bad,' and it will be a lot easier to keep moving forward and to stay motivated."

The New Year is a great opportunity for professional growth. With the increased public and governmental attention being given to information as both an asset and potential liability, the challenges facing records and information management (RIM) professionals are becoming more evident day by day. Those challenges provide additional opportunities for RIM professionals to raise their profile and contribute to their organizations' success, particularly in the areas when RIM intersects with legal and IT on such issues as compliance, electronic discovery, information technology implementalions, and information security. There is no better time for RIM professionals to improve and expand their skills (especially in those areas), emphasize the important role they play in their organizations, increase exposure for their profession, and contribute to its body of knowledge.

With professional growth in mind, consider these tips from the experts at myGoal.com for developing the perfect....and achievable.....New Year's resolutions.

Create a Plan

Goal setting is great, but without a plan it is meaningless. For a resolution to have resolve, (as the word "resolution" implies), it must have actionable steps that are clearly articulated. …

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