Magazine article Drug Topics

More Therapies for IBS Symptoms Coming

Magazine article Drug Topics

More Therapies for IBS Symptoms Coming

Article excerpt

As many as one in five Americans, or 55 million people, suffer with the abdominal discomfort associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). Symptoms vary from patient to patient but typically include abdominal pain and discomfort with changes in bowel function-either predominantly diarrhea (IBS-d) or constipation (IBS-c). Some patients, however, experience a mixed form (IBS-m), with alternating diarrhea and constipation. Currently there exist few therapies for treating the condition; however, several entities in development look promising.

* Renzapride, an investigational therapy from Alizyme (Cambridge, UK), is both a 5-HT3 antagonist and a 5-HT4 agonist. This drug candidate may be beneficial in all three types of IBS-for which there are currently no available treatments-and is currently being tested for both IBS-c and IBS-m.

In phase II, renzapride led to a 25% improvement in relief of overall IBS symptoms, compared with placebo, when tested in patients with IBS-c. Renzapride increased the frequency of bowel movements for patients with constipation and improved stool consistency. The drug was also tested in 168 patients in Europe with IBS-m. In a small phase II trial of 48 patients with IBS-c at the Mayo Clinic, renzapride was associated with an improvement in bowel function scores and accelerated colonie transit, although gastric emptying and small bowel transit were not affected. Currently, the drug is being evaluated in a phase III trial for safety and efficacy in 1,700 females with IBS-c. Results are expected in the second half of 2007, according to the manufacturer.

* Another promising compound is nsimadoline, a kappa opioid agonist. The kappa opioid receptors are found along the digestive tract and are believed to play an important role in control of visceral pain and bowel motility, according to manufacturer Tioga Pharmaceuticals. The drug is believed to work in part by blocking sodium channels in the gut. Discovered by Merck KGaA of Germany, asimadoline is an oral therapy developed originally to treat peripheral pain, such as arthritis.

Tioga is conducting a phase IIa study in 600 men and women that will evaluate three different dosages of asimadoline versus placebo. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.