Magazine article Stanford Social Innovation Review

Editor's Note

Magazine article Stanford Social Innovation Review

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

THE CURRENT ISSUE OF SSIR HIGHLIGHTS THE power of debate and the importance of challenging conventional wisdom.

In the provocative piece "Social Entrepreneurship: The Case for Definition," Roger L. Martin, dean of the Joseph L. Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto, and Sally Osberg, president and CEO of the Skoll Foundation, take on the vexing questions of what is, and what is not, social entrepreneurship. They argue passionately that in order to advance our understanding of the phenomenon, the field must have a definition of it that is precise. Accordingly, Martin and Osberg advocate a narrow conception of social entrepreneurship centered on their notion of an entrepreneur's ability to transform an "unsatisfactory" and "unpleasant equilibrium" into a "new stable equilibrium" that is more efficient, effective, or just.

Interestingly, the authors' approach stands in direct contrast to New York University professor Paul C. Light's call for a broader definition of the term in his article "Reshaping Social Entrepreneurship," published in the Fall 2006 issue of SSJR. No doubt, these competing views will stimulate and perhaps even incite further debate, a discussion that we believe and hope will advance the theory and practice of social entrepreneurship.

Drawing on data from a study of more than 200,000 nonprofits founded in the U.S. after 1970, Bridgespan consultants William Foster and Gail Fine shatter prevailing assumptions in their article "How Nonprofits Get Really Big. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.