Magazine article American Cinematographer

Flying Feathers, Blood and Guts

Magazine article American Cinematographer

Flying Feathers, Blood and Guts

Article excerpt

When director Tony Scott wanted a spectacular finale to his feature film, "True Romance," DP Jeffrey I. Kimball, A.S.C., knew this was an assignment for Unilux. Kimball describes "Romance," which will be released by Warner Brothers this summer, as "a rock and roll adventure."

The film stars Christian Slater, who becomes romantically involved with a call girl played by Patricia Arquette. Slater persuades her to leave the business and helps her pack her suitcase. They are soon shocked to learn that her case and the cocaine-filled suitcase of a drug dealer have been switched.

They decide to sell the cocaine and live happily ever after. Unfortunately, the drug dealer has other ideas. What follows is a classic chase movie ending in a scene where Slater and Arquette, the police, members of a drug gang and a drug dealer, who is a producer looking at rushes, are caught in a violent crossfire.

The scene had many elements that could only be captured with strobe lighting - feathers flying from exploding couches, blood erupting from gunshot wounds, bullets ricocheting off walls and cocaine bursting from the suitcase.

To add to the confusion and heighten the drama, Kimball also used Unilux to film the wild gyrations of the projector, which was upset when the producer tried to escape the mayhem. …

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