Magazine article Out

Sword-Crossing and Threesomes? What's Really Going on in the Male World of Entourage?

Magazine article Out

Sword-Crossing and Threesomes? What's Really Going on in the Male World of Entourage?

Article excerpt

Four single guys live In a tricked-out mansion in the Hollywood Hills. One drives, one cooks, one manages, and one is the diva. While this may sound like a Logo reality show, it's HBO's series Entourage (the fourth season debuted April 8), in which the main characters are more attached to each other than to the women they regularly bed.

Though it's several steps beyond a male version of Sex and the City, Entourage is largely about five guys in search of tail, in a modern-day Gomorrah where (female) ass is always available for the right price, be it a thousand big ones or just a few cocktails.

Why, then, are Vince, Johnny "Drama," Eric, Turtle, and Ari arguably the gayest straight characters on television?

When they're not talking about getting laid, they're preoccupied with the male body, particularly the nutrition- and plastic surgery-obsessed Drama. Like many heterosexual men, they call each other "faggot" and "cock breath" as a way of defining their straight identities. When there's a moment of intimacy, some gay comic relief will often break the tension, and the gay moments pile up faster than a producer's call log: Turtle and Drama accidentally "cross swords" during a threesome; the latter has a run-in with a straight male masseur who interprets his friendly gestures as a sexual pass. "These five guys really love each other in a straight, heterosexual way," says series creator Doug Ellin. "But they love each other more than most groups of guys this age." Sex aside, these guys might as well be daring each other.

When it comes down to business-and there's very little difference between scoring in the boardroom or the bedroom-Vince's affairs are handled by trash-talking superagent Ari Gold, the unofficial fifth member of the group. Ari serially harasses both women and men. With his "gaysian" assistant, Lloyd, office banter goes from the ridiculous ("Lloyd, get in here! I want to make out with you!") to the hilariously offensive ("I will choke you out with a strap-on!").

Despite all their bravado-sometimes borderline homophobic, more often harmless and humorous-there's a sweetness about the way the boys deal with actual gay people. When Johnny's upset about Lloyd's hiring, arguing that "An should have a hot assistant," Vince generously replies, "Johnny, some people probably think he is hot."

"All five of the guys have zero hate or intolerance in them," says Ellin. "They are more than just respectful; these are good guys who like most people. As far as their words [such as calling each other "queer"], that's just how New York guys do it. These are words, guys referring to guys, that have nothing to do with homosexuality."

While some viewers might not buy that argument, Ellin claims his goal is to present the most realistic view of Hollywood he can, with occasional exaggeration. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.