Magazine article Drug Topics

R.Ph.S Can Teach Patients about Metabolic Syndrome

Magazine article Drug Topics

R.Ph.S Can Teach Patients about Metabolic Syndrome

Article excerpt

Pharmacists, as a valuable part of the Healthcare team, can impact clinical outcomes by educating patients on their health conditions, disease states, and risk factors. This was the opinion of researchers who recently presented study findings at the American Heart Association's 47th Annual Conference on Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention in Orlando, FIa. The study focused on the impact of pharmacists on a community outreach screening project about metabolic syndrome.

Approximately 47 million Americans have metabolic syndrome. TIw Tliird Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Ex^iert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults defines metabolic syndrome as three or more of the following abnormalities: waist circumference > 40 in. in men and > 35 in. in women; serum triglycérides (TG) of > 150 mg/dL or on drug therapy for elevated TGs; high-density lipoprotein (HDL) level < 40 mg/dL in men and < 50 mg/dL in women or on drug therapy for reduced HDL; blood pressure > 130/85 or on drug therapy for hypertension; and fasting blood glucose > 110 mg/dL or on drug therapy for elevated glucose. People with metabolic syndrome are at increased risk for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease as well as increased mortality for cardiovascular disease and all causes.

With the assistance of a grant from the American Heart Association, a group of pharmacists and pharmacy students conducted a study to educate participants employed at a public school in a town near Little Rock, Ark., about metabolic syndrome.

The first part of the study was conducted in January 2006, with a follow-up after four months. "This was a voluntary study in which all employees were invited to participate. We performed a clinical screening on 112 participants. It measured each of the five risk factors for metabolic syndrome," stated Amy Franks, Pharm.D., assistant professor at the College of Pharmacy at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Pharmacists and pharmacy students held individual sessions with each person to discuss patient risks and what patients could do to lower their overall risk for heart disease. "When necessary, we referred them to their healthcare provider to discuss drug therapy or other measures they could implement," added Franks.

Participants were provided a survey to test their knowledge about metabolic syndrome. …

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