Magazine article Sunset

Good Bones, Great Light

Magazine article Sunset

Good Bones, Great Light

Article excerpt

He converted a dark fixer-upper into an airy platform for indoor-outdoor living

My friends thought I was crazy," recalls architect Malcolm Davis about his decision to purchase this turn-of-the-century home in San Francisco's Noe Valley. "Most prospective buyers had walked in, looked at the home in disbelief, and left." The home had been plagued by numerous remodels, "none of which were sympathetic to the original design," he explains. But where others saw an eyesore, Davis found beautiful bones.

His approach was to remove all evidence of the remodels, repair the original house, and adapt it for contemporary living. That meant bringing in as much natural light as possible and maximizing the view of the city.

He opened up the first floor, creating one large living-- dining-kitchen space (that also incorporates a home office) running from front to back. The view-facing wall at the rear opens through three tall French doors to a balcony off the dining area. A breakfast nook occupies an adjacent glass bay. A wide bay window captures sunshine from the south-facing front of the house, helping to balance the light.

Davis incorporated salvage yard finds with an understated palette of materials in keeping with the simple, straightforward character of the original house, including honey-toned fir cabinetry and stainless steel counters. …

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