Magazine article Out

Waking Life

Magazine article Out

Waking Life

Article excerpt

On their incendiary first album, Girl in a Coma shun uniformity an d add some depth to punk-and yes, they're serious.

When Girl in a Coma surrendered the spotlight to Manhattan's transsexual gadabout Amanda Lepore for their video "Road to Home," the San Antonio-based twang-punk trio weren't concerned about underexposing themselves. "We wanted to have a story line, not just play and sing into the camera," explains Phanie Diaz, the group's drummer. A smoky, hard-edged ballad, "Road to Home" calls to mind a cryptic David Lynch film and an endless night of whiskey-fueled epiphanies. Lepore's character sways seductively onstage in a dark bar, lip-synching the torchy lyrics while legendary rocker Joan Jett and the band-Diaz, her younger sister and front woman Nina, and queer bassist Jenn Alva-act as her rapt audience. Meanwhile, a troubled down-at-heel drifter is so moved by the performance that he ends up shaving in the bathroom, donning a wig and a skirt, then replacing Lepore to deliver the song's haunting final lines. "He's very intrigued by her," says Nina, who penned "Road to Home," of the video's transformed protagonist and his glam muse. "He discovers he wants to be a transvesrite-that's where he belongs."

Formed in 2001, Girl in a Coma-who took their name from the classic Smiths tune "Girfriend in a Coma"-have garnered comparisons to the Pixies, Patsy Cline, and to Moz himself. …

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