Magazine article American Cinematographer

From the Editor

Magazine article American Cinematographer

From the Editor

Article excerpt

We are in the process of redesigning the format for AMERICAN CINEMATOGRAPHER and as a result have done a lot of thinking recently about the function of the magazine and how it can best serve its readers. While we are constantly evaluating the feedback we get, two things seem to be clear. First is that the magazine should encompass all aspects of production. Cinematography in the strict sense of lighting and camerawork will always be the cornerstone of the magazine just as it is the cornerstone of production itself, but everything from grip work to make-up to editing to music and sound effects should also have its place in the magazine.

Secondly, the magazine serves to connect various aspects of the industry. For those who speak computerese I would say that the magazine is the ideal interface between large and small, young and old, managers and craftsmen, photo-chemical and electronic, pre-production, production and post-production. Not only can it be a way for a producer to better understand how a cameraman or an art director works (and vice versa) but it can be a way for a cameraman who works on smaller productions and cameramen who shoot multi-million dollar features to learn from each other. I am convinced that it works both ways. A feature cameraman who is accustomed to large crews and luxurious budgets can learn something from the resourcefulness of his colleague who has to figure out a way to get an effect with little time or money. Obviously this is especially true in the current economic climate.

Wayne Wadhams' article in this issue on the sound recording techniques for LIANNA and THE secAUCUS SEVEN seem to me to be a perfect example of this form of cross fertilization. Regardless of what a sound man or producer or production manager might feel about the level of production value in LIANNA (and I personally believe it is perfectly suited to the story content and the audience for which it is designed), Wadhams raises basic questions about the conventional approach to sound recording on large budget productions which everyone would be well advised to contemplate before embarking on a production of any sort. …

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