Magazine article American Cinematographer

New Fuji Negatives

Magazine article American Cinematographer

New Fuji Negatives

Article excerpt

It is one of the cornerstones of faith in the free enterprise system that nothing promotes progress, both technical and economic, like good, honest competition. Thus, the introduction in the late 1980 of the high speed Fujicolor negative film A250 (Type 8518) with a nominal conservative exposure index of 250 was received with enthusiasm by the professional cinematographic community. In July, 1981, the demand for the material temporarily so far exceeded the supply that various studios were borrowing rolls of it from one another to meet emergency needs. Initially offered to be used in "available light" and other low-light level conditions, the film came to be utilized more and more for studio interiors, for indoor locations and for practically all situations except bright sunlight, although some directors of photography even preferred to use it for an entire production.

Some of the productions for which higher speed Fuji negative was used in whole or in part, together with Fuji regular negative film, are DAS BOOT, MISSING, SHARKEY'S MACHINE, KING OF COMEDY, THE SWORD & THE SORCERER. Television productions include: "Dallas," "Falcon Crest," "Knott's Landing," "Cagney & Lacey," and "The Blue &The Gray."

Because Fuji A250 (Type 8518) contributed so significantly to widening the opportunities of cinematographers, directors and producers in production, it was no surprise to the industry that the Fuji Photo Film Company was awarded an Oscar in 1982 by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences for its innovative achievement. In the present writer's opinion, one of the important benefits to the cinematographic fraternity of Fuji's faster film, and the competitive film it inspired, is that the use of motion picture negative film for the shooting of motion pictures for television gained a new lease on life regardless of whether or not the subsequent editing and distribution is accomplished on videotape or on film.

One of the trends in TV production now seems to be toward shooting on film, transferring the negative to videotape, and performing the editing and optical effects in the magnetic medium. At the same time, methods have been devised that allow the finished version to be recreated on film by making it convenient to conform the original negative so that regular 35mm film prints can be made for theatrical release in foreign countries, where desired, or 16mm prints for TV distribution in areas where the use of videotape copies is not feasible.

Stimulated, in turn, by competition, Fuji is now currently making available new, improved, and faster versions of both its higher speed film (Type 8518) and its standard speed negative (Type 8517). …

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