Magazine article American Cinematographer

In Memoriam: Charles Galloway Clarke

Magazine article American Cinematographer

In Memoriam: Charles Galloway Clarke

Article excerpt

Charles Galloway Clarke, died July 1, at the age of 84.

Clarke, known to his colleagues as a rugged individualist, was especially known for his work on films made in far away and often difficult locations. He went to sea for Mutiny on the Bounty (1935), to Mexico for Viva Villa (1934) and Captain From Castile (1947), to China for The Good Earth (1937), to Africa for The Snows of Kilimanjaro (1952), to Borneo for Three Came Home (1950), to England for Prince Valiant (1954), to Germany for The Big Lift (1950) and Night People (1954), to France for On the Riviera (1951) and The Sun Also Rises (1957), and to Japan for four pictures including Stopover Tokyo (1957) and The Barbarian and the Geisha (1958).

He was on his way to the northernmost tip of Alaska to shoot location scenes for Fox in 1928, when his aircraft was forced down in the wilderness. He and Jack Robertson remained with the plane for nine days with little food. When their provisions ran out and searchers had not found them, they walked more than 150 miles across the tundra, reaching the Arctic shore after nine days without sleep or food. After medical attention at Point Barrow, Clarke returned to Hollywood and, on the next morning, began work on a John Ford production.

He was also noted for his handling of atmospheric films such as Moontide (1942), one of four pictures for which he was nominated for Academy Awards, and several "Char lie Chan" and "Mr. Moto" pictures.

Clarke was born March 18, 1899, in Potter Valley, California, the son of a Methodist minister. …

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