Magazine article American Cinematographer

Fifth Annual Emmy Awards Creative Arts in Television

Magazine article American Cinematographer

Fifth Annual Emmy Awards Creative Arts in Television

Article excerpt

The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences pays tribute to the creative artists "who utilize their special kind of magic to bring ideas to life"

As has been its custom for the past several years, the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences sponsored a dual celebration of excellence in Nighttime Programming. On the evening of Saturday, September 8, 1979 it held its Fifth Annual Emmy Awards Banquet honoring Creative Arts in Television in the Exhibition Hall of The Pasadena Center.

On the following evening, Sunday, September 9, the Academy .telecast on the ABC Television Network its ThirtyFirst Annual Emmy Awards for Nighttime Programming. The program originated in the Pasadena Civic Auditorium.

For readers of American Cinematographer, the Saturday night event was by far the more significant, since it honored the technical artists and craftsmen who work behind the scenes to make those "out-front" register at their best on the television tube. The non-telecast affair, held in the tastefully decorated Exhibition Hall, was characterized by a warmth and intimacy somewhat less evident in the more flamboyant event of Sunday night. It featured radio/television luminary Michael Jackson as host and the presenters included: Beau Bridges, Charlene Tilton, Max Gail, Kristy McNichol, Jamie Farr, Audra Lindley, Olivia Cole, Robert Walden, Loni Anderson, Stan Shaw and Robert Reed. Hank Rieger, President of the TV Academy, presided over the affair.

The awards were widely distributed throughout the two dozen categories, with only three shows ending up with two awards each. The dual winners were "LITTLE HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE" (cinematography/series and music/ series), "FRIENDLY FIRE" (sound editing and music/special), and "BATTLESTAR GALACTICA" (costume design/series and individual achievement in creative technical craft).

Winners in the Cinematography categories were two veteran artists of the camera, both of whom had won Emmys previously.

In the category of Outstanding Cinematography/Series, the winner was Ted Voigtlander, ASC, for "LITTLE HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE" (The Craftsman), NBC. This marked the ninth nomination for Mr. Voigtlander and his third Emmy Award. He received his first statuette for "IT'S GOOD TO BE ALIVE" (1974), and his second last year, also for an episode of "LITTLE HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE".

In the category of Outstanding Cinematography/Limited Series or Special, the winner was Howard Schwartz, ASC. Nominated a total of seven times, he won last year for "THE GHOST OF FLIGHT 401".

NBC led the networks with 10 craft awards. ABC has seven, CBS three, PBS and syndicated shows two each. In addition, an Emmy was awarded to Ampex "for the development of an automatic Scan Tracking System for helical videotape equipment," and a special citation went to Magican "for the development of real-time tracking of independent scenes."

Throughout the evening, host Michael Jackson and the various presenters paid tribute to the honorees as the creative artists "who utilize their special kind of magic to bring ideas to life" . …

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