Magazine article Parks & Recreation

The Latest Tool of the Trade-The S.Park Revolution Video

Magazine article Parks & Recreation

The Latest Tool of the Trade-The S.Park Revolution Video

Article excerpt

You probably don't know it, but there used to be a skateboard ramp in your neighbor's backyard. It might not have been up for more than a week or a month, but it was there. A parent, realizing that the safest place to skate definitely was not the street, gave in to the repeated pleadings for a place to kill the grass for the summer. But at the same time, the same parent saw that their son or daughter and a couple of friends suddenly multiply into throngs of kids. The ramp, then, usually found its way from the backyard to the woodpile. If it didn't happen that way, maybe a city official stopped by or called just to let the parents know that they knew about it. It's not that the parent didn't want their kids skateboarding, it's just that they don't want to be responsible for the safety of every skateboarder in the time zone. And entrepreneurs shied away from private facilities due to the usual liability worries and the fact that you can't cram 100 skaters in a space that would accommodate as many rollerskaters.

Now that the word is out that cities across the United States are providing public skating areas-like basketball and tennis courts-your department might be looking into providing for their communities; enter the S.Park Revolution,the video primer for the skatepark uprising. This educational tool is offered-at cost-to anyone interested in furthering the common causes of skateboarding and in-line skating by learning about the many benefits that skateparks offer for both city and skater.

The S.Park Revolution documents, in detail, what it takes to start the ball-bearings rolling. The first part features mayors risk managers, city attorneys, and fellow parkand recreation professionals, dispelling common fears and misconceptions about city-run skateparks. The second part deals with the particulars, including: funding, cost, location, and size. It starts the networking process, connecting the cities that know first-hand what their skatepark has done for their community and the cities that want to know. …

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