Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Study Looks at Impact of Family Childhood Poverty

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Study Looks at Impact of Family Childhood Poverty

Article excerpt

ANN ARBOR, Mich. - Boys raised by poor families earn considerably less money as adults than boys raised by middle-class families, according to a study by the University of Michigan.

The study involved more than 1,300 men - 58 percent White, 42 percent African American - between the ages of twenty-five and thirty-five. It found that boys who grew up poor earn between 41 percent and 63 percent less per year and 29 percent less per hour than boys raised in middle-class households.

"Parental poverty is the strongest and most consistent predictor of men's economic outcomes," said Mary E. Corcoran, a professor of political science, public policy and social work who conducted the study along with colleague Terry Adams. "Our most striking finding is that parental poverty has large effects on sons' annual earning and hourly wages - and these effects are similar for Blacks and non-Blacks. …

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