Magazine article National Defense

Naval Leaders Make a Case for the Relevance of Sea Services

Magazine article National Defense

Naval Leaders Make a Case for the Relevance of Sea Services

Article excerpt

THE NOTION THAT shelves at Wal-Mart could be depleted or gasoline could cost $5 a gallon may seem inconceivable to most Americans.

But that is exactly what would happen if a foreign country or a stateless terrorist organization managed to disrupt the ocean shipping routes along which thousands of cargo and tanker vessels travel every day, Navy officials insist.

An armed conflict at sea that interrupts commerce, in other words, is bad news for most of the civilized world and should be prevented at all costs.

Those are some of the underpinnings of a new naval planning document - "A Cooperative Strategy for 21st Century Sea Power" - that was recently endorsed by the Navy, the Marine Corps and the Coast Guard.

The strategy is not expected to bring about any major changes in the services' organization or ways of doing business. Rather, it is intended to remind Congress and other non-military audiences that the sea services are relevant to the nation's security.

"I found that people do not appreciate the role that sea power plays in this country... They take it for granted," says Vice Adm. John G. Morgan Jr., deputy chief of naval operations for plans and strategy.

"We have an obligation to better explain why sea power is important, how it affects our way of life," Morgan says in a recent interview. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.