Magazine article Multicultural Education

An Essential Voice

Magazine article Multicultural Education

An Essential Voice

Article excerpt

My mom smiled as she spoke, "You can catch up, and you'll still take the math class that all the other kids are taking in addition to this one. It's only for a year."

My dad and mom's smiles told me that they were convinced this was the right thing for their kid, but those smiles weren't the kind that made a kid smile back.

It was July 5th when a letter labeled "To the parents of Scott Lambert" caused my stomach to begin a gymnastics routine that it usually saved for math tests. The letter stated that as an incoming sixth-grader, test scores and my teacher from last year recommended that I be placed in something called Essential Math.

As my mom said, it would catch me up. It meant a lot to her and my dad, but I didn't like what Essential Math meant for me. What it meant was that I had to give up learning to play the trumpet to fit Essential Math into my schedule. It meant that I couldn't participate in band, the one thing that actually made me look forward to the beginning of the school year. It meant there would be no music, no high point, in my day. It meant exclusion; I never could be a part of our school's band because I missed out on learning an instrument in sixth grade. It meant a label; I became one of the dumb kids who had to go math twice a day, instead making just one trip to a music class.

It meant a change in my behavior. I avoided talking about music and math, not wanting anyone to know how hurt I was because of them. I slouched on my way in to math; I wished I was invisible so no one could see me. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.