Magazine article AI Magazine

"Always Interesting": Al in the News

Magazine article AI Magazine

"Always Interesting": Al in the News

Article excerpt

http://www.aaai.org/aitopics/html/current.html

Farms Fund Robots to Replace Migrant Fruit Pickers. Eliza Strickland. Wired. June 21, 2007 (www.wired. com). "As if the debate over immigration and guest worker programs wasn't complicated enough, now a couple of robots are rolling into the middle of it. Vision Robotics, a San Diego company, is working on a pair of robots that would trundle through orchards plucking oranges, apples or other fruit from the trees. In a few years, troops of these machines could perform the tedious and labor-intensive task of fruit picking that currently employs thousands of migrant workers each season. The robotic work has been funded entirely by agricultural associations, and pushed forward by the uncertainty surrounding the migrant labor force. Farmers are 'very, very nervous about the availability and cost of labor in the near future,' says Vision Robotics CEO Derek Morikawa."

Robot Invasion - A World Ruled By Robots May Not Be Far Off. Ed Boyle. CBS News. June 21, 2007 (www.cbsnews.com). "The British Government has just paid a great deal of human taxpayers' hard cash for a special report into the rights of tomorrow's robots. Rights? What conceivable rights would a tin can on wheels ever deserve, you may ask? Well, if it has some kind of built-in artificial intelligence then, according to the Government advisers, it might be entitled to social security benefits, free housing and even healthcare. ... In your country the Pentagon is designing an airborne robot hitman capable of tracking and killing. Tell it who to take out. It decides how and when to do the job. But over here we're thinking of giving it the right to go on strike."

Computers Read News, and Trade on It Quickly. Kevin Plumberg. Reuters. June 25, 2007 (www.reuters. com). "It takes a person about 10 minutes to read a 2,500-word, front-page feature story in the Wall Street Journal. Computer programs increasingly being used by investors to parse news stories can process one in about three onehundredths of a second. ... Rather than just highlight words or phrases, some of the most sophisticated news mining platforms can take multiple strands of news from wire agencies and Web sites and score the significance of various items."

Algorithmic Trading - Ahead of the Tape. The Best Newsreaders May Soon be Computers. The Economist. June 21, 2007 (www.economist. com). "As the time taken to process computer-generated trades falls to thousandths of a second, algorithms are being created to react to news headlines faster than the eye can scan them. Dow Jones and Reuters, the news providers, now offer electronically 'tagged' news products that algorithms pick up to make programmed trading decisions. ... Britain's Financial Services Authority, a regulator, also hopes to use algorithms to comb through trading data to find hints of suspicious activity, which it reckons takes place before about a quarter of all takeover announcements. Algorithmic trading accounts for a third of all share trades in America and the Aite Group, a consultancy, reckons it will make up more than half the share volumes and a fifth of options trades by 2010. ... According to TowerGroup, a research firm, $480M is likely to be spent in America this year on developing technology for algorithmic trading. ... Now that trading algorithms are reading the news, are they also getting the story faster than journalists can? ... Eventually, the news may come from reading the algorithmic trades, not the other way around."

Big Brother Is Watching You... and He's a Computer. The Threat of Cameras Combined with Artificial Intelligence. …

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