Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Congressional Panel Tracks Income Gap in College Attendance

Magazine article Black Issues in Higher Education

Congressional Panel Tracks Income Gap in College Attendance

Article excerpt

A new report from a congressional advisory panel paints a bleak picture of college access for low-and middle-income high school students with a strong record of academic achievement.

Nearly half of these high school graduates in 2002 -- or 400,000 youth -- will not go to public four-year colleges and universities because of cost considerations, says the Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance. Some of these youth will opt for lower-cost community colleges, but 170,000 will attend no college at all, says the committee's report, "Empty Promises: The Myth of College Access in America."

Over a 10-year period, more than 4 million of these students will choose not to attend a four-year institution, while 2 million may opt for no college education at all.

"For these students, the promise of a college education is an empty one," the committee says, and the loss of human development and capital "will exact a serious economic and social toll for much of this century." The committee's 11 members include Henry Givens, president of Harris-Stowe State College, a historically Black college in St. Louis.

The committee's report says low- and moderate-income students, on average, need another $3,000 a year in aid before a four-year public college becomes accessible financially to a top low-and middle-income student. And even those who do begin college with those financial needs have difficulty staying in college because of these financial barriers. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.