Magazine article Parenting for High Potential

Php's Parenting Forum

Magazine article Parenting for High Potential

Php's Parenting Forum

Article excerpt

NAGC provides a Parent Resource Specialist service, whose role involves supporting parents and others who advocate for appropriate and challenging educational opportunities for high-potential children and youth. Our Parent Resource Specialist, Dr. Robin Schader, has agreed to expand her services to include a regular "question-and-answer" column for Parenting for High Potential.

Important Notice. Dr. Schaders services as NAGCs Parent Resource Specialist are designed to help readers find and understand general information on parenting high-ability children. The responses in this column (or on NAGC's website) contain advice and comments from individuals with training and experience in gifted education. Responses from the Parent Specialist, or other participating experts, are not intended to provide a basis for action in partiadar circumstances without consideration by a competent professional. By submitting your question for a response, you understand and agree that your question, and the Parent Specialist's answer, may be used by NAGC in print or on the NAGC website, although names and other obvious identifiers will be removed. Often the best way to resolve issues for your child is to talk with your child's teacher, school principal, pediatrician, or doctor. If you haven't already done so, we encourage you to investigate the resources available through your state or local gifted education organization. Contact information for NAGC state affiliates can be found on the NAGC website at: http://www.nagc.org/ or by calling NAGC at (202) 785-4268. Submit your questions in an email, or as document attachment to an email, to:parentspeciaUst@nagc.org

Excerpts from Parent Email: Is "Productive Perfectionism" an Oxymoron?

* Our son is seven years old. We have noticed periods of depression that seem out of proportion to his age and the situation. They are usually reactions to perceived failures. It all seems to hinge on the need for perfectionism that goes along with his gift.

* My gifted son is very dependent on his teacher or us (his parents) when it comes to solving problems. He doesn't want to get it wrong. He gets very upset if an answer doesn't come easily to him. He gets very upset and frustrated if his answers are not right. He never wants to be wrong, so many times he won't try new things unless I encourage, nag, or demand. This results in anger from me and tears from him. How do I help him be a more independent learner?

* How can we help our daughter rebuild what is now a very fragile self-image? While her potential is great, we don't know how to instill courage and confidence. We've got to help her "dig out" somehow from her overly self-critical state.

* I am interested in finding some resources that will help me figure out how hard I should push my child and what level and quality of work should be expected from her? Her test scores are very high, however she often breaks down before even trying to complete an assignment in class. She does not appear to be working at her ability level - but she doesn't seem to have very good coping skills when pushed for more. Where can I look for information to help me figure out what is best for her?

* What can I do to make my son understand the importance of applying himself to his full potential? He has been tested and is very gifted in every subject. He is choosing not to do assignments and or doing just enough to get by. For instance, he was given a project two weeks before his two-week Christmas vacation and he did nothing in the four weeks. Now that it is due in two days he is finally working on it and will probably get it done, but not as well as it could have been. What can we as parents do to help him understand the importance of his responsibility to fulfill his obligation to himself and to teach him that life is not just getting by with the bare minimum work he is choosing to do?

Although several of these excerpts involve academic situations, the concerns apply to most endeavors that require periods of concentration, work, and practice in order to achieve expertise. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.