Magazine article Pastoral Music

From the President

Magazine article Pastoral Music

From the President

Article excerpt

Dear Members:

Have you read Sing to the Lord: Music in Divine Worship (STL)? The bishops of the United States approved these new guidelines on liturgical music at their meeting last November in Baltimore. The full text is available online at http://www.usccb.org/liturgy/ SingToTheLord.pdf.

In this issue of Pastoral Music we present articles on various dimensions of this important document, which replaces Music in Catholic Worship (MCW, 1972) and Liturgical Music Today (LMT, 1982).

I hope that you will find these articles helpful, but I urge you to read the document itself, to study it, and to reflect on it. With apologies to David Letterman, here are the ten top reasons why I believe you need to read STL:

10. STL offers detailed practical guidance for singing the Mass and other-often neglected-rites of the Church. The guidelines found in STL reflect norms found the most recent editions of the ritual books, including the General Instruction of the Roman Missal (2002).

9. STL challenges liturgical music leaders to reexamine their priorities for the parts to be sung by congregations, giving first place to dialogues and acclamations and then to antiphons and psalms.

8. STL deals with the often controversial questions of incorporating chant, polyphony, Latin, contemporary songs, and music that reflect diverse cultures and languages. The document takes a both/and approach that pastoral musicians will find both helpful and challenging.

7. STL identifies the acoustics of a church as a major element in the promotion of good liturgical singing.

6. STL emphasizes the responsibility of Catholic schools and other educational institutions to prepare both congregations and liturgical ministers to sing the liturgy.

5. STL gives extensive treatment to the important role of ordained ministers-bishops, priests, and deacons-in singing their own parts of the liturgy, especially the dialogues, and in joining the song of the entire assembly. …

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