Magazine article Workforce Management

Generation Whine

Magazine article Workforce Management

Generation Whine

Article excerpt

"I see [Millennials] both in the classroom environment and the corporate environment, and I am not impressed by their performance in either venue."

IN THE MAIL | from our readers

I READ YOUR ARTICLE "Millennials at the gate" (The Last Word, March 3) with more than a passing interest. I can't say I agree with your final assessment that the Millennials have much of anything to teach us by way of values. I am of the baby-boom generation, class of '46.1 worked my way through both my college degrees; I am seldom, if ever, working less than two jobs and, in the end, I'm not so sure that's been a bad thing.

I despair more and more that the U.S. has any chance of maintaining its position as a world leader in business or innovation or much of anything for that matter. Every semester as an adjunct associate professor of business at our local community college, I look out over the faces of these Millennials and find nary a critical thinker, a problem solver or even a motivated learner. Few can write a coherent sentence, having "texted" away whatever grammar and spelling they ever knew. They complain that too much homework interferes with their other activities and have expectations about how the instructor should "support" their efforts.

I hope you are right and that I am being too pessimistic about this generation. My problem is that I see them both in the classroom environment and the corporate environment, and I am not impressed by their performance in either venue.

Susan Hager

Clinton, New Jersey

VMS SHORTCOMINGS

REGARDING THE article "All Eyes on VMS" (February 18): Managing a sizable workforce has evolved considerably over the past decade. The growing complexity of contingent labor paved the way for a technological revolution. To fill the void, independent Web-based vendor management systems (VMS) emerged.

The article about the bankruptcy of Axium International and its subsidiary, Ensemble Chimes Global, illustrated the risks of working with a VMS-based solution. The original VMS value proposition, which included replacing human intermediation with a "technology-only" solution, failed to meet client expectations. It quickly became clear that experienced program design, deployment and management services, in addition to technology, were necessary. …

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