Magazine article Techniques

ACTE Tours McKinley Technical High School

Magazine article Techniques

ACTE Tours McKinley Technical High School

Article excerpt

CELEBRATING CTE MONTH 2008

THE FIRST PART OF A SERIES THAT CELEBRATES CTE MONTH 2008. "I REALLY ENJOYED THIS VISIT BECAUSE IT ALLOWS US TO SEE THE STUDENTS IN THEIR OWN ENVIRONMENT-OBSERVING AND LEARNING FIRSTHAND HOW THESE STUDENTS ARE GAINING INVALUABLE EXPERIENCE AND THE SKILLS THEY WILL NEED FOR THE FUTURE."

A DELEGATION OF VISITORS DESCENDED ON MCKINLEY TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL in Washington, D.C., on February 19 for Career and Technical Education (CTE) Month. ACTE staff, several congressional staffers, staff from SkillsUSA, FCCEA and the District of Columbia Department of Career and Technical Education visited the school-a public charter which offers three themed pathways in biomedical, information and broadcast technologies. Students provided a guided tour and answered questions about their areas of study. The group observed classes in each theme and students demonstrated lessons and projects they are working on in the classroom. The visiting group got a firsthand look at how students are learning at the school, and how CTE is having a positive impact on students and their community.

A Love of Bioscience

Biology teacher Joseph Isaac teaches molecular biology to juniors and seniors. Isaac engages students by developing creative assignments like cutting DNA with enzymes, checking if food has been genetically altered or modified, and crime scene investigations. For Isaac's midterm exam in December 2007, students had to solve "Who killed Dr. Bootney Farnsworth?" Students became investigators analyzing the crime scene of Farnsworth's murder. They collected blood, hair samples and bullet casings that they took over to the CSI lab (Isaac's class) to solve the case. The experiment provided students an opportunity to apply the main concepts of forensics and gain laboratory techniques.

Bridging the Generation Gap

Rick Kelsey, technology curriculum director at McKinley, announced the school won a $100,000 grant from AARP to implement a program called "Senior to Senior." Starting in the fall, the students will teach seniors how to use technology to help bridge the generation gap. As part of the curriculum, seniors will select a topic and spend one or two semesters developing it while they utilize 21st century skills. …

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