Magazine article Filmmaker

Film Fetishist

Magazine article Filmmaker

Film Fetishist

Article excerpt

Luis Buñuel always intended to challenge convention and throughout his nearly 50-year career he did not fail. After meeting Salvador Dalí during his college days, the Spanish filmmaker collaborated with the surrealist artist on their notorious 1929 film, Un chien andalou. The short begins with a woman's eyeball slit by a razor blade. Upon release, the film caused an uproar, but it later became a surrealist classic.

Despite - or because of - being born into a wealthy family, for Buñuel topics such as authority, the bourgeoisie and organized religion were recurring themes. His storylines are full of sly references to Freudianism, Marxism and the Roman Catholic Church, jabs that remained constant as his films progressed from provocations like Un chien andalou and L'Âge d'or through such later satires as The Discrete Charm of the Bourgeoisie. The breadth of Buñuel's career is captured in Taschen Books' new Luis Buñuel: The Complete Films. This biographical study by Bill Krohn was made with full access to the director's photo archives and contains the bold layout and copious use of still photos that the label's cinema books are known for.

Of his various fixations, which include a fascination with sexual fetishism and the female form, Buñuel is quoted as saying, "I am not preoccupied by my obsessions. …

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