Magazine article IAJRC Journal

Gratitude

Magazine article IAJRC Journal

Gratitude

Article excerpt

Hadley Caliman

Gratitude

Origin 82499

Hadley Caliman (ts), Thomas Marriott (tpt), Joe Locke (vib), Phil Sparks (b), Joe La Barbera (d), Seattle, WA, Sept. 20, 2007.

Back For More/This Is New/Invitation/Kickin' On The Inside/Comencio/Linda/If/Joe Joe Dancer Bossa Nova/Old Devil Moon, TT: 48:15

For the past 25 years or so, West Coast tenor saxophonist Hadley Caliman has maintained an avuncular presence on the Seattle jazz scene, mentoring younger players, and perhaps denying himself some of the recognition he might have enjoyed had he been based in one of the larger urban centers. Gratitude is his first recording as a leader in some 30 years. It offers convincing evidence that the 76-year-old underground legend has lost none of the fire for which he is recognized by his peers, if not the general public who have had limited exposure to this wonderful free spirit of jazz.

Born in Oklahoma in 1932, Caliman grew up in Los Angeles and made his professional debut while still a teenager in 1949 as a member of the regrettably short-lived Roy Porter Big Band, sitting alongside the likes of Art Farmer, Eric Dolphy and Joe Maini. Around this time he acquired the nickname 'Little Dex' from his close association with Dexter Gordon. In the 50's and 60's, Caliman's soulful tenor contributed to the bands of Gerald Wilson, Bobby Bryant, Mongo Santamaria, and Carmell Jones, to name only a few. He continued playing jazz in the 1970's (Freddie Hubbard, Joe Henderson, etc.), and also secured high profile gigs on the rock scene as a sideman for Carlos Santana and the Grateful Dead. During this period he released four LPs as a leader, two of which (Celebration and Projecting) were reissued in Japan in 2003 . Since moving to Seattle, he has been active musically there, and also taught for many years at the city's Cornish College of the Arts.

Listeners to this new album will note the John Coltrane influence in Hadley's urgent sound, though as Jim Wilke points out in the liners, he favors a more rounded tone characteristic of such West Coast tenors as Harold Land or Teddy Edwards. His solos cut a somewhat elliptical path unlike the even phrasing of the Prez-influenced crowd, and he uses very little vibrato. …

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