Magazine article Medical Economics

Effective Smoking Cessation Interventions

Magazine article Medical Economics

Effective Smoking Cessation Interventions

Article excerpt

PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIANS HAVE THE SINGLE MOST IMPORTANT ROLE IN GETTING PATIENTS TO QUIT

[ EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES ]

After participating in this activity, physicians should be able to:

List the benefits of smoking cessation.

Describe their role in managing smoking cessation.

Contrast and compare different pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies for smoking cessation.

ACCREDITATION

cme^sup 2^ is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

CREDIT DESIGNATION

cme^sup 2^ designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(TM). Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

TARGET AUDIENCE

Primary care physicians

TO EARN CREDIT FOR THIS ACTIVITY

Participants should study the article, log on to modernmedicine.com, click on the "CME/CE Center" tab at the top of the page, and type in keyword: ME091908. Participants will be taken to the activity, where they must pass a post-test and complete an online evaluation. After passing the post-test and completing the online evaluation, a CME certificate will be automatically generated. The release date for this activity is September 19, 2008. The expiration date is September 30, 2009.

Please note: First-time visitors to the site will be asked to register (this is a quick and easy process, and there are no registration fees attached-it is complimentary).

DISCLOSURES

The authors, editors, and reviewers of this article disclose they do not have any financial relationships with any products mentioned in the article.

RESOLUTION OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

cme^sup 2^ has implemented a process to resolve conflicts of interest for each Continuing Medical Education activity, to ensure content objectivity, independence, and fair balance, and that the content is aligned with the interest of the public. Conflicts, if any, are resolved through a peer-review process.

UNAPPROVED/OFF-LABEL USE DISCUSSION

Faculty may discuss information about pharmaceutical agents, devices, or diagnostic products that are outside of PDA-approved labeling.The author discusses the off-label use of clonidine and nortriptyline.This information is intended solely for CME and is not intended to promote off-label use of these medications. If you have questions, contact the medical affairs department of the manufacturer for the most recent prescribing information. Faculty are required to disclose any off-label discussion.

Smoking may be the single most important health issue in the United States today, and physicians must take a more proactive role in initiating cessation therapy. More than 20 percent of the adult U.S. population smokes, resulting in a doubling of that group's risk of stroke, a 2- to 3-times greater risk of dying from coronary artery disease (CAD), and a 10 times greater risk of peripheral vascular disease (PVD).1 Smoking causes 30 percent of all cancer deaths, shortens the average lifespan by 13 to 14 years, and leads to more than 438,000 deaths annually in the United States.1,2

Effective and relatively inexpensive therapies exist that can help patients stop smoking. Yet all too often, physicians overlook patients' smoking, neglect to even elicit a history of its presence, and/or fail to offer an evidence-based effective therapy to treat it.

All physicians have a golden opportunity to address the problem. Almost three-fourths of all smokers visit a physician at least annually, and 70 percent or more report that they want to quit Despite this unusual convergence of factors expected to lead to physician-led successful interventions, reality often falls short of anticipation.

Too many patients are not being asked about tobacco use, too few smokers are being advised to quit, and neither medication nor counseling services are routinely provided. …

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