Magazine article Out

Guiseppe and the Giant Peach

Magazine article Out

Guiseppe and the Giant Peach

Article excerpt

Happy birthday, Bellini! Turning 60 never tasted so good.

The creation story of the Bellini is well known: At Harry's Bar in Venice, Italy, in the late 1940s, head barman Giuseppe Cipriani was looking for a way to use his beloved Italian white peaches in a cocktail. After many unsuccessful attempts to mix peach juice with spirits like whisky or gin, he stumbled on the simplest and most elegant partner, prosecco. The blend of sweet fresh peach juice and effervescent Italian wine was at once pretty and feminine, dry and masculine, delightful in the evening, and gently consoling in the morning. Ernest Hemingway and Orson Welles lent their influential stamps of approval to the versatile drink, and it entered the cultural pantheon. Now in its 60th year, the drink remains untampered with, a rare thing in the current anythinggoes foodie-influenced atmosphere of the cocktail renaissance. Aside from small innovations, like Brooklyn cocktail leader Dressler's addition of a dash of peach bitters (which adds a sophisticated counterbalance to the sweetness), you simply don't mess with the recipe. Ideally it's made with juice from Italian white peaches, but California produces an acceptable yellow variety. Prosecco is a must. The Bellini is made one way, and like a true classic, one way it shall stay. JASON ROWAN

POUR, THIRSTY SOULS

The Bellini is traditionally made only one way: onethird part white peach juice, poured into the glass first, topped with two-thirds part chilled prosecco.

But 'tis the season for bubbly, so try Dressler's variation, or mix up your repertoire with some other celebratory champagne champs. …

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