Magazine article The Human Life Review

About This Issue . .

Magazine article The Human Life Review

About This Issue . .

Article excerpt

. . . "abortion," our late founding editor J.P. McFadden wrote in the Introduction to the first issue (Winter 1975), "is intimately linked to many other problems that confront Americans today, from such obviously related life-and-death issues as euthanasia to much broader social questions that are bound to arise if, in fact, the 'abortion mentality' produces a society in which the 'future' generations are a distinct minority."

"Abortion," writes George McKenna in our lead article, "is now one subset of an overarching right: the right to kill innocent people - the right to kill yourself, to help others kill themselves, to kill mentally impaired people by depriving them of food and water, to kill embryos for their stem cells, to kill the embryos and fetuses of peasants who have too many children" ("Lying: Occasional and Organized," page 7).

McFadden saw before most that granting Constitutional status to the abortion "right" would reverberate throughout the world of bioethics. In the Summer 1975 issue of the Review, he reprinted an essay by another prescient observer, the playwright Eugene Ionesco, who concluded by asking, "in the future what will be the state of mind people will find themselves in when they go or are delivered to the care of a hospital?"

The future, long-time anti-euthanasia activists Rita Marker and Wesley Smith tell us, is now. Our 2008 Great Defender of Life honorees, each has contributed an article to this issue: Marker reports on how the political strategy used to bring physician-assisted suicide to Oregon-still the only state to sanction it-has been adapted to bring it to Washington ("^Oregon Plus One' Equals Fifty? …

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