Magazine article The Spectator

Books

Magazine article The Spectator

Books

Article excerpt

Manuel Alvarez Bravo, born in 1902, lived to be 100 and worked as a photographer in Mexico for eight decades. He was destined to spend his life as a clerk in a provincial tax office but escaped with the help of Edward Weston and Tina Modotti. This collection, which contains 370 of his images, confirms his versatility. His work included landscapes, portraits, reportage, nudes and occasional excursions into surrealism. It is frequently described as 'mysterious' by critics looking for context or commitment. But there is no mystery; it is just that Bravo was generally more interested in form than in argument.

He was not concerned with telling a story, and the titles he felt compelled to add to his pictures are generally a distraction.

Bravo was one of a gifted generation of artists who pinned their hopes on revolution. An iconic group portrait shows Trotsky, André Breton and Diego Rivera framed by two unidentified blondes and labelled '1939'. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.