Magazine article American Cinematographer

Editor's Note

Magazine article American Cinematographer

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

The recent trend toward 3-D production continues with Coraline, a digital stop-motion fantasy about a girl who discovers a menacing parallel world behind the walls of her family's new home. The project's ambitious cinematography was supervised by Pete Kozachik, ASC, who brought considerable experience to the table(top) after serving as director of photography on The Nightmare Before Christmas and Corpse Bride.

Adding a third dimension to stop-motion cinematography took Kozachik, director Henry Selick and their collaborators down some fascinating avenues. In a detailed, firsthand account ("2 Worlds in 3 Dimensions," page 26), Kozachik outlines some of the trickiest aspects of 3-D production, as well as the filmmakers' solutions. "My advice to anyone starting out fresh with 3-D is to seek counsel from a veteran of 3-D production and experiment when you have enough experience to be conversant," he cautions.

Bill Pope, ASC brought a similar willingness to push creative boundaries to The Spirit, based on Will Eisner's comic-book character and directed by graphic-novel titan Frank Miller. Digging further into an approach previously used on Sin City ana 300, two big-screen adaptations of Miller's own work. Pope shot the picture largely against greenscreen, including eye-popping dry-for-wet sequences shot with a Phantom high-speed camera at frame rates of 200 to 400 fps. "You can do the dumbest stuff in the world, and when you're filming at 400 fps, suddenly you're a poet," Pope quips in his chat with associate editor Jon D. …

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