Magazine article Perspectives on Language and Literacy

Response to Intervention: Principles and Strategies for Effective Practice

Magazine article Perspectives on Language and Literacy

Response to Intervention: Principles and Strategies for Effective Practice

Article excerpt

RESPONSE TO INTERVENTION: PRINCIPLES AND STRATEGIES FOR EFFECTIVE PRACTICE By Rachel Brown-Chidsey and Mark W. Steege, 2005 Guilford Press. Paperback. 176 pages. $32.00

As a part of Guilford Press's Practical Intervention in the Schools Series, this timely book's stated purpose is to help teachers, psychologists, and other educational specialists understand and use Response to Intervention (RTI) in the classroom. The authors, Drs. Brown-Chidsey and Stege, both from the University of Southern Maine, provide a comprehensive guide to implementing a schoolwide RTI program. Their preface states, "RTI principles and strategies have been around for a long time and are based on scientific methods." This text outlines a system whereby "scientific methods can be used in schools on a daily basis to select, use, and review instructional practices in classrooms."

Chapters clearly and seamlessly integrate past and recent research with legislative mandates to show what BrownChidsey and Stege call "linkages across educational policies," including NCLB and IDEIA, that mandate or include RTI. RTI is defined as "an objective examination of the cause-effect relationship(s) between academic or behavioral intervention and the student's response to the intervention." With the profession of education moving toward scientifically-based practices, defined here as "instructional methods and pedagogical approaches that have been verified by numerous research studies," the authors set the stage for their comprehensive 10-step program to implement an effective RTI program. To begin this discussion, the RTI approach is contrasted with the older discrepancy model frequently used to diagnose and identify learning problems for eligibility for remediation. Research is cited showing the problematic nature of sole use of the discrepancy formula to guide identification or remediation as well as the benefits of an RTI model. …

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