Magazine article Work & Family Life

A Polite Refusal May Be Good for Your Health

Magazine article Work & Family Life

A Polite Refusal May Be Good for Your Health

Article excerpt

Granted, there are some requests we simply can't turn down - at work, at home and in our communities. But there are others that we might (and should) refuse, if only we had the presence of mind to do so clearly and politely, yet firmly.

Learning how to say "no" can be important to your health. Stress associated with over-commitment can cause symptoms of depression and anxiety as well as physical problems such as insomnia, headaches, muscle tension and high blood pressure, according to a Taiwan study reported in the journal Chronobiological International.

"We need to have the wisdom to know what we can take on and what we can't, and the courage to say no to ex- cessive demands," says Dr. Albert Yeung, director of primary care studies with the depression clinical and research program at Massachusetts General Hospital.

He offers a few simple rules:

NO EXCUSES. People realize that we all have our limits. You don't have to explain why you're saying no - but it's helpful to have a response ready. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.