Magazine article Teach

Notes

Magazine article Teach

Notes

Article excerpt

We know that technology's footprint is shrinking and becoming increasingly portable. When we see a young person with a cellular phone or a handheld gaming device, the normal reaction is one of distraction. In other words, these are not instruments that have any place within the hallowed halls of an institution, certainly not in a classroom environment. They would be disruptive and divisive in the conventional classroom.

However.

If the idea of bringing real-world tools and resources into the classroom makes sense, then the aforementioned devices, that are, in essence, communications media, have a place after all. That is, if they're used properly and adhere to actual learning outcomes. We know that the classroom extends well beyond its four walls. Anyone with a wireless connection and an Internet account knows that. Instead of condemning 'tools of distraction' perhaps they should be embraced in the modern context of learning since they are pieces of technology with which students have great familiarity and reliance. As do parents when it comes to cellular phones, for example.

In a feature article, Carmen Berg makes a compelling argument for acceptance and utilization of these portable tools and explains how they can be used to the advantage of the teacher and the student. …

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