Magazine article Montessori Life

Networking as Collaboration: A Montessori Model

Magazine article Montessori Life

Networking as Collaboration: A Montessori Model

Article excerpt

Montessori teachers start their days in a variety of ways. When children enter the classroom environment, some teachers invite them to sit down in circle for a moment of silence or to greet each other in a friendly way. And in another classroom, children might be walking in, getting out their materials, and starting their daily work cycles. I try to imagine all the Montessori classrooms around the world and the variations in routine each room models. As teachers, we are constantly experimenting to find the best way to establish routines, develop scope and sequences, and work on classroom management so we can foster independence and social and cognitive growth in children. Yet there are times when we sit in our individual environments and feel we are alone in this quest for a normalized classroom.

I am comforted by the idea that Montessori teachers from around the word at one time or another are thinking these same thoughts. We face the same challenges, trials, and struggles, and we all have thought to ourselves, "Am I the only one dealing with this?" Thinking on a global scale is a way to remind ourselves that as Montessorians, we are never alone. Thinking globally opens us up to the comforting idea that we are united as Montessori teachers.

Montessori teachers often struggle to find ways to communicate with their colleagues, yet reaching out to others is a critical component of being a well-rounded Montessorian. After all, only another Montessorian can understand the specific challenges facing all of us in our own classrooms. Perhaps one way to facilitate communication between teachers is to model a technique used in the business world. Businessmen and women promote networking within their professional fields: They trade business cards, contact information, and the like in an effort to expand their business network. What an intriguing concept! The latest twist on this is called "speed networking": communicating information to as many people as possible in a brief period of time. In this way, networking puts us in touch with many more people who can share their experiences with us and, we, in turn, can share our experiences with them.

So how can networking help us become better teachers? …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.