Magazine article Baylor Business Review

Studying at Baylor during the Great Depression

Magazine article Baylor Business Review

Studying at Baylor during the Great Depression

Article excerpt

Dear Tim-

I was so impressed by the story describing what you and your wife Tracie are doing to get an education that I felt compelled to write both of you a letter of admiration and appreciation. What you two are doing brings back such wonderful memories of what my late wife, Kitty (Katherine Day), and I did during the Great Depression years of 1932-1937 to get "educated" at Baylor.

Kitty and I met as freshmen. We were not poor, we just didn't have any money! We were both able to make all of our expenses--tuition, fees, blanket tax, books, room & board--without any exchange of cash. My dad had a dairy farm near Dallas (now in Dallas), so I brought two of the milk cows to Baylor with me. They provided my room and board all the way. Kitty was able to live at home on South 6th Street but worked at the Baylor Press for 25c an hour to make her other Baylor expenses. I worked on campus too and eventually made the top student wage of 35c an hour as a student assistant to Neill Morris, Baylor's long-time superintendent of buildings and grounds. We never received any cash from our campus jobs but were able instead to redeem our wages in goods and services through the university system. At that time the university, which operated three 12-week terms plus one in the summer, charged the considerable sum of $60 per term.

At one time, total enrollment dropped to about 1,000. Consequently, practically all students, faculty and administrators knew each other on a personal basis. …

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