Magazine article Black Masks

Taking Care of Business

Magazine article Black Masks

Taking Care of Business

Article excerpt

It is little wonder that in these times when economic concerns are at the forefront of eveyone's minds that all three articles in this issue discuss some aspect of the business side of the arts. Marie Moore LyIe 's article reveals how Dyann Robinson is working hard with Tuskegee Repertory Theatre Company to navigate successfully the waters in which many a Black theatre has floundered - the lack of long-range stability and imminent vulnerability as a result of not owning their own theater house. Of all the Black theatres I have known in New York City, only one, Barbara Ann Teer's National Black Theatre, on the comer of 125th Street and Fifth Avenue in Harlem, has owned its theatre house. Even the flagship Black theatre, the Negro Ensemble Theatre Company, only leased its space. In the 1980s and '90s, innumerable arts organizations found themselves homeless when NYC real estate prices escalated and rents went through the roof. Few were as fortunate and as resourceful as the New Federal Theatre that has been able to forge long-term alliances with social agencies that have supplied relative security across more than thirty-five years. Yet, even there, a change of circumstances led to the dissolution of an historical alliance with the Henry Street Settlement and the removal of the theatre from its home in the Arts for Living Center several years back.

Interestingly, Woodie King Jr., New Federal Theatre's founder and director focuses on the nuts and bolts of book marketing in his interview of Anthony D. …

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