Magazine article Filmmaker

Resurrection

Magazine article Filmmaker

Resurrection

Article excerpt

For more than a decade the news out of Africa about its fight against the AIDS pandemic has been grave. Much of the continent is uneducated about the virus, children are still born with HIV or become orphans because of it, and the money sent to help people in need is often siphoned by corrupt governments.

But recently there's been a glimmer of hope, as Lance Bangs chronicles in his intimate documentary The Lazarus Effect. Originated through Bono's (RED), the U2 singer's "not a charity" that directs private sector funds to the purchase of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) for AIDS sufferers in Africa, the film chronicles Bangs's journeys to Zambia to show how these ARVs are greatly improving the health of infected Africans.

Known for directing music videos for Sonic Youth, R.E.M. and Green Day in the '90s, and most recently his behind-the-scenes documentaries for films like Being John Malkovich, Be Kind Rewind and Where the Wild Things Are, Bangs was working with Spike Jonze on their doc Tell Them Anything You Want: A Portrait of Maurice Sendak when he learned of (RED)'s project. "I had friends who died of AIDS in the '80s and '90s," Bangs says. "Then I stopped hearing that much about AIDS, and with the ARVs being so accessible in the West, I didn't understand all of the reasons why there wasn't the same access in the rest of the world." Bangs jumped on a plane and spent two weeks in clinics in Zambia last May filming people who were just starting to take the ARVs. The trip also gave Bangs ideas on how he wanted to tell the story. "I didn't want to make a film where white people are commenting about Africans," he says, "I wanted to show people in their daily lives. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.