Magazine article The Human Life Review

Why I Changed from a Pro-Choice Believer to a Pro-Life Advocate

Magazine article The Human Life Review

Why I Changed from a Pro-Choice Believer to a Pro-Life Advocate

Article excerpt

APPENDIX B

"A voice is heard in Ramah, mourning, and great weeping, Rachel weeping for her children and refusing to be comforted, because her children are no more." - Jeremiah 31:15

Thirty-seven years year ago abortion-on-demand was bom in America. Conceived during the "free-love" revolution of the 1960s and gestated by the self-indulged baby boomers, abortion was delivered to the nation by an activist Supreme Court on Jan. 22, 1973. Today, the Roe v. Wade decision stands as the epitome of judicial usurpation of the legislative process.

From these murky origins, abortion has matriculated into adulthood. Along the way it has gathered its own steam. Abortion is now the undisputed law of the land, but it is still an emotional and divisive issue that may be one of the key factors that unhinges Obama's health care makeover.

But the truth is, abortion transcends politics and how our society ultimately deals with it will determine what historians will say about our culture.

My Odyssey from being a pro-choice believer to a pro-life advocate occurred during my internship in pediatrics at UCLA. During those months of training in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), while caring for the smallest of premature infants, I began to reconsider my views about abortion. The humanity of these tiniest of people was clearly evident. But what wore me down was the schizophrenia of what was going on in the hospital. How could pediatricians on one end of this great hospital struggle at great financial and emotional cost to save the lives of some babies while at the other end of the very same hospital, children of the same gestation age were being aborted. This incongruity sparked a struggle in my mind. I became a student of abortion and as I became more informed, my opinion changed.

The proponents of abortion made several claims before legalization occurred. One of their first assertions was that abortion would reduce the incidence of child abuse. They were dead wrong. In 1973, there were 167,000 reported cases of child abuse. Compare that to the staggering 3.5 million cases of child abuse and neglect that were reported in 2005. Today, nearly four children die each day from abuse.

Abortion did not cure child abuse. In fact, it has skyrocketed over 2,000 percent over the past 37 years.

Next, abortion activists predicted that abortion would reduce poverty. Again they were wrong. Instead, poverty has become "feminized" and women and children now constitute the new poverty class in America. …

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