Magazine article New Internationalist

New Internationalist

Magazine article New Internationalist

New Internationalist

Article excerpt

Deported people behave pretty conveniently once they have been bundled off. They keep quiet.

There are a number of reasons why they do this. They have been shamed and traumatized by what they have undergone and want a clean break. They have landed into great danger and have gone into hiding. They have no wherewithal to support themselves and are struggling to survive. Or perhaps maintaining contact with the life they had wanted and had to leave behind is just too painful.

So when I started digging around for people who had suffered deportation and who would be willing to talk to me, I kept drawing a blank. Some were too afraid to talk, even under conditions of anonymity.

But more often the anti-deportation activists I got in touch with said that after the first few frantic exchanges, people tended to slip away. The pressures of the life they had been flung into ruled out further contact.

It's a silence that suits the authorities of wealthy countries who continue to treat people in this inhumane fashion, branding them 'bogus', and claiming smugly that deportees face no danger and have been resettled. …

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