Magazine article Washington Report on Middle East Affairs

Obituaries

Magazine article Washington Report on Middle East Affairs

Obituaries

Article excerpt

Osama Anwar Okasha, 69, one of Egypt's most celebrated teledramatists, noted for his coverage of politics, died May 28 at a Cairo hospital. During the 1980s, he became a well-known fixture throughout the Arab world for his role in the six-part soap opera "Laili al Helamia" (The Nights of al Halmia). Born in the Nile Delta city of Tanta, Egypt, Okasha studied sociology at Cairo's Ain Shams University, graduating in 1962. With more than 35 TV shows to his credit, Okasha was seen as having reshaped modern Arab TV drama. He also published many screenplays and stage dramas focusing on such Egyptian political issues as corruption, unemployment, oppression, and abuse. In recent years, Okasha was known for an article brutally critiquing the Egyptian government.

Moishe Rosen, 78, the Jewish-born Baptist minister and controversial founder of the evangelical group Jews for Jesus, died May 19 of prostate cancer in San Francisco. Born in Kansas City to a practicing Orthodox Jewish family, he converted to Christianity with his Jewish-born wife in 1953. Disowned by his family, he became involved in the Messianic Jewish community. By 1973 he founded Jews for Jesus, the largest and most well known Messianic Jewish movement, which holds that Jews can believe in Jesus as the messiah while still retaining their Jewish identity. Drawing inspiration from Vietnam-era protest movements, Rosen became famous for his catchy street theater performances, printed pamphlets, and unique street-side missionary efforts. The group grew quickly, with many converts found especially among Jews in the former Soviet Union, in Israel, and and among Russian immigrants in the U. …

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