Magazine article Techniques

Funeral Director

Magazine article Techniques

Funeral Director

Article excerpt

FUNERAL DIRECTORS' RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE removing the deceased to a mortuary, preparing the body, performing a ceremony that addresses the needs of the family, preparing an obituary, and carrying out the final disposition of the body. The American Board of Funeral Service Education (ABFSE) calls it a "human service profession," because only a small percentage of the funeral director's time is spent preparing the body, while the overwhelming majority of time is spent working directly with families.

The Workplace

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, most funeral homes are small, family-run businesses, and many funeral directors are owner-operators or employees with managerial responsibilities. ABFSE notes that funeral directors can expect to work a regular schedule of hours plus additional hours in the evening and on weekends, either on call or in the funeral home.

Educational Requirements

According to ABFSE, each state has its own licensing regulations governing entry as a funeral director, and the amount of college required varies from state to state - from none to four years. However, most states require a combination of postsecondary education (typically an associate degree in funeral service education), passage of the National Board Examination, and service as an apprentice for one or two years. …

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