Magazine article Management Services

Britain's Work-Related Fatalities Down, but Still Not Acceptable

Magazine article Management Services

Britain's Work-Related Fatalities Down, but Still Not Acceptable

Article excerpt

Provisional statistics for the year 2001/2002 indicate a decrease of 15% in the number of fatal injuries among Britain's workers, with 249 deaths compared to 292 in 2000/01. The rate of fatal injury dropped from 1.03 to 0.88 per 100,000 workers over the period.

The number of fatal injuries to employees fell from 213 to 204, while fatal injuries to the self-employed fell from 79 to 45. A breakdown of the figures is available at: www.hse.gov.uk/statistics/injury.htm

Of the 249 fatalities, 79 occurred in the construction industry and 39 in agriculture. In terms of type of fatality, 68 deaths were due to falls from height, 43 from moving or flying objects, and 40 from moving vehicles.

Commenting on the figures, Health and Safety Commission (HSE) Chair Bill Callaghan said: "Last year saw a considerable increase in the number of work-related fatalities in Britain - and I would have been bitterly disappointed to see the numbers remain at that level.

"However, it is too soon to draw conclusions on whether the 2001/2002 figures represent a long-term downward trend. For example, the figures are still 13% higher than two years ago. Every death is one too many - and each causes pain and suffering for the victim, their friends and family. The levels are still unacceptable.

"Our task now is to work for sustained improvement. This can only be achieved through partnership between employers, workers, trade unions and safety representatives. It is vital that they all work with us to achieve the government and HSC's health and safety targets.

"I want to focus on three key areas. …

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