Magazine article The Spectator

Mexican Rave

Magazine article The Spectator

Mexican Rave

Article excerpt

Possibly the greatest ever festival of chess took place in Mexico City towards the end of last year when Garry Kasparov and Anatoly Karpov descended on La Universidad Nacional Autonoma De Mexico (UNAM), which chose a chess theme to celebrate its centenary. The campus was overwhelmed by thousands of visitors clamouring to see exhibitions of chess art, a reconstruction of Baron von Kempelen's chessplaying automaton, lectures on the educational aspects of chess as well as a powerful quadrangular tournament, won by Judith Polgar, and the Hispanic Nations Championship, which was won by Gilberto Milos.

Polgar's victory in the quadrangular tournament was marked by two games in which she used her king in a fashion which renounced castling, thus harking back to the days of Steinitz, whose theories propounded the value of the king as a fighting piece. Most strong players prefer to castle their king into safety at an early stage of the game, but not so Steinitz and the newly enlightened Polgar. Here is the opening of a typical Steinitz game played against a strong rival at Baden Baden in 1870.

Steinitz-Paulsen: Baden Baden 1870; King's Gambit 1 e4 e5 2 Nc3 Nc6 3 f4 exf4 4 d4 Qh4+ 5 Ke2 d6 6 Nf3 Bg4 7 Bxf4 0-0-0 8 Ke3 Qh5 9 Be2 Qa5 10 a3 Bxf3 (see diagram 1) Steinitz now played 11 Kxf3 when, with the advantage of central pawn control and two bishops, he went on to win.

Polgar-Topalov: UNAM, Mexico City 2010; King's Gambit In this game from UNAM Topalov has overlooked that White can play in Steinitzian fashion and now win material (see diagram 2). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.