Magazine article National Association of School Psychologists. Communique

School Psychology Practice Model: Examples from the Field

Magazine article National Association of School Psychologists. Communique

School Psychology Practice Model: Examples from the Field

Article excerpt

In March, 2010, NASP adopted its revised professional standards that consist of four documents: (a) Standards for Graduate Preparation of School Psychologists, (b) Standards for the Credentialing of School Psychologists, (c) Principles for Professional Ethics, and the (d) Model for Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services. Online versions of these documents can be found at http://www. nasponline.org/standards/2010standards.aspx.

The Model for Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services, also known as the NASP Practice Model, outlines 10 general domains of school psychological practices. This article is one in a series entitled, "School Psychology Practice Model: Examples from the Field." The series will highlight various domains within the Practice Model and, perhaps more importantly, illustrate how school psychologists apply the standards in their everyday activities.

DOMAIN 1: DATA-BASED DECISION MAKING AND ACCOUNTABILITY

Domain 1, Data-Based Decision Making and Accountability, is considered a practice that permeates all aspects of service delivery. For many school psychologists, this practice manifests itself in the form of comprehensive assessments, determining the existence of a disability, and determining eligibility for special education services. It remains a critical component of service delivery and can include many different data-based decision-making tools and models. Data-based decision-making should also be used to guide the development, implementation, and monitoring of effective interventions, programs, and services that support students. We collect data from multiple sources (e.g., individual, classroom, family, school, and community characteristics) to inform decisions at various levels (e.g., individual, classroom, school-wide, district-wide, statewide, and national) in multiple settings (e.g., general education, special education), using multiple methods (e.g., surveys, universal screening, observations, curriculumbased assessments, standardized testing).

Data-based decision making and accountability is hardly a new concept. Nevertheless, the importance of using data to make decisions, and then being accountable for those decisions, has gained increased attention since the 2000 NASP professional standards were adopted. This is due, in part, to legislation such as the soon to be reauthorized Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and the continued scrutiny of underachievement in schools. …

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