Magazine article The New Yorker

Edi & the Wolf

Magazine article The New Yorker

Edi & the Wolf

Article excerpt

At this new Austrian tavern, wedged into an increasingly companionable stretch of Alphabet City, "Edi" is pronounced "Eddie" and "the Wolf" does not refer to Harvey Keitel's character in "Pulp Fiction." These are the nicknames of the co-owners, Eduard Frauneder and Wolfgang Ban, a pair of Austrian migrs who also run the graceful Sesonal, on Fifty-eighth Street, of which Edi & the Wolf is the downtown, down-market iteration. This is but the first of many linguistic challenges that await. Edi and the Wolf say their latest spot was inspired by Austria's Heurigen (wine gardens), and they tried to imbue it with gemtlichkeit (a spirit of coziness). Cozy, yes; gardens, no. From the sidewalk, Edi & the Wolf resembles a forsaken industrial garage. The inside holds what appears to be the hoard of an exuberant and undiscerning band of freegans: old wooden chairs affixed to the walls at curious angles, worn leather boots filled with dead flowers, a forty-foot rope salvaged from a Bed-Stuy belfry strung like crpe paper above the bar. Yet little lights installed in the cracks of the ceiling lend the chaos an ethereal glow.

It can help, when facing a night of Blaufrnkisch and Schokolade Nuss Palatschinken, to bring along an authority. …

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