Magazine article The Spectator

Banned Wagon

Magazine article The Spectator

Banned Wagon

Article excerpt

ONE of my wife's ancestors was consumed by cannibals in the South Seas in the mid-18th century. I don't think the government of Tonga, or wherever the meal took place, would be terribly impressed if a lawsuit arrived on its desk demanding reparations.

If you are descended from a black American slave, on the other hand, it may well be worth your while dropping a line to the city authorities in Chicago where a law has just been passed demanding that any company seeking a contract from the city will have to declare any profits that they may have made from owning, insuring or trading in slaves. They now face having to pay levies to the survivors of slaves - no matter that the recipients themselves will never have known forced labour.

Chicago's move is but the tip of a global industry in slavery reparations. A body called the African World Reparations and Repatriation Truth Commission has demanded that the West pay $777 trillion in compensation to the descendants of black slaves. …

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