Magazine article Stage Directions

Hacking the Mix

Magazine article Stage Directions

Hacking the Mix

Article excerpt

Need to mix unobtrusively? We built an app for that.

For a production of TTie Laramie Project at the U niversity of California, Irvine, sound designerTim Brown wanted to create sound scapes forthe intermissions that would be loud enough to be noticeable, but not so loud that they overwhelmed the audience. Because ambient volume could never be predicted, the intermission sound would have to be mixed live - but the sound booth was acoustically isolated from the audience chamber. Installing a small mixing console was an unattractive option as even a small desk would draw attention to itself and the mixer. Brown wanted the mixer and the effect to be unobtrusive. When he approached me to brainstorm solutions, we decided to mix via the most ubiquitous object on a college campus: an iPod.

An iPod Touch was small enough not to draw attention to itself, and the mixer would look like they were sending text messages on it, not controlling audio. Because it worked on WiFi, our engineer could move about the house easily, adjusting the mix as he went. Finally, the iPod Touch could send Open Sound Control (OSC) messages to the sound playback computer in the booth. OSC was developed at the UC Berkeley Center for New Music and Audio Technology and is a protocol that allows for communication between devices over a modern network.

On the iPod Touch, I used an app called Mrmr to build a simple mixer to control the volume: one button for "up" and one for "down. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.