Magazine article Risk Management

Workplace Fatalities Remain High in 2001

Magazine article Risk Management

Workplace Fatalities Remain High in 2001

Article excerpt

On the average day in 2001, sixteen workers were fatally injured in the United States, adding up to 8,786 casualties during the year, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics' (BLS) Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries.

Excluding the events of September 11, however, the 2001 overall occupational fatality rate remained consistent with the 2000 figures, at 4.3 fatalities per 100,000 workers throughout all industries. In the census, the BLS includes only those deaths that occur while individuals are employed and engaged in a legal work activity.

Construction once again had the highest number of fatalities, with 1,225. But even with the largest number of deaths, construction had only the third most dangerous industry fatality rate. Mining, with 170 deaths, was the most dangerous field, with 30 fatalities per 100,000 employed-nearly 700 percent above the overall average. Agriculture was the second most dangerous sector with 22.8 deaths per 100,000 employed.

As for the safest industries, finance, service, retail trade, government and manufacturing all ranked below the average fatality rate. …

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