Magazine article The American Organist

Orgelwerke

Magazine article The American Organist

Orgelwerke

Article excerpt

GERD ZACHER: ORGELWERKE. Gerd Zacher, organist. IV/62 Karl Schuke organ (1968) of the Evangelischen Kirke, EssenRellinghausen, Germany. Cybele Records SACD 060.501. Cybele.de; info@cybele.de. Born in 1929, organist Gerd Zacher is best known for his interpretations of the music of J.S. Bach, Messiaen, and many contemporary composers. Through his teachers, he traces his musical lineage to Reger, Straube, and Busoni. Zacher's organ works show him to be a composer on the cutting edge. He eschews common-practice tonality, as well as modern tonal systems such as those of Messiaen. Instead, he delves into novel, innovative approaches to sound production at the organ. Each of the six works on this recording demonstrates a different, unique approach to composition. The Sieben Stationen eines Textes are based on Jeremiah 36, verses 1, 4, 8,13,15,23, and 32. The composer describes the music as "changing changes, variations on variations," citing the fact that the prophetic word is delivered in various circumstances in Jeremiah's text. Through the use of a twelve-tone row, Zacher seeks to convey "the transformations which transpire." Szmaty is a musical commentary on Psalm 22:19, which (referring to Christ) tells of dividing His clothes and casting lots for His robe following the Crucifixion. The title is Polish for "rags." Zacher equates each of the word's five sounds to a particular sonority on the organ (e.g., SZ = rustling, M = humming, etc.). He structures the work according to these sounds. In Vocalise, Zacher creates an etude for the swell pedal. He calls for precise rhythmic operation of the swell shutters, which, when closed, produce a "U" (or "M") sound, and when open, an "A" sound. He superimposes two "bell" clusters of three notes each, overlaying these with various "melodies," mixture sonorities, and accents, which fade in and out, depending on the position of the swell pedal. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.