Magazine article The Spectator

Banned Wagon

Magazine article The Spectator

Banned Wagon

Article excerpt

EVERYBODY likes the idea of saving endangered species, but it is notable how the zeal with which Western governments will defend them seems to grow in proportion to the distance those species live from the West.

Next week, the grandly named Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (Cites), meeting in Santiago, will reach a decision on whether to allow five African countries - South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, Zambia and Zimbabwe - to resume a very limited trade in ivory. Don't hold your breath: Western environmentalists have refused to countenance ever lifting the worldwide ban on ivory-trading since it was introduced in 1989. This is in spite of the fact that African countries now have vast stocks of ivory extracted from elephants who have keeled over from natural causes. As a result, poor countries have been deprived of a means of earning muchneeded hard currency. Elephants are not even endangered any longer: in fact, they are so numerous in parts of Africa that gamekeepers are having to consider birth control to prevent numbers getting out of hand. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.